Based on your details, you can compare the following home loans

What is a home loan calculator?

Also called a "mortgage calculator", a home loan calculator can help you to:

  • Find a low rate: Work out the lowest interest rates you can afford, and how much you could save compared to a higher rate loan. 
  • Find out how much you can borrow: Use your income and saved deposit to work out how much you can afford to borrow and comfortably repay.
  • Find out how much you’ll pay in interest: Break down the total cost of your loan, and see how much total interest you’ll pay when you buy a property.

Keep in mind that a mortgage calculator does not take every aspect of your personal situation into account, and is not a substitute for professional financial advice.

How to use a home loan calculator

To find the estimated repayments on a home loan, simply enter a few details into our home loan calculator:

  • How much you’d like to borrow
  • The interest rate you’d like to pay
  • Your preferred repayment type e.g. Principal and Interest or Interest Only
  • Your borrower type e.g. Owner Occupier or Investor
  • The loan term you’d like to take to pay off your debt

Using this information, we can calculate:

  • Your estimated repayments (weekly, monthly, or fortnightly)
  • The total interest payable
  • The total amount payable
  • Your repayment schedule

Our calculator can also show you how much you could potentially save by adjusting your loan term or other figures, and help you compare home loans that may suit the requirements you’ve entered. 

Why should I use a mortgage calculator?

Using a mortgage calculator at a comparison site such as RateCity may help you estimate the costs and benefits of a wider variety of loan choices, and gain a deeper understanding of how a new home loan’s features can affect its overall value. 

Mortgage calculators, such as those found on RateCity, can help you quickly and easily compare the costs and benefits of home loans from a variety of different mortgage lenders – simply enter the details of each offer to estimate its overall value. 

Using a bank’s home loan calculator, such as those from the Commonwealth Bank, ANZ or another major lender, may help you estimate the cost of repayments for its own mortgage products, which can be handy if you’re looking at a specific home loan from a specific bank or lender. 

However, bank mortgage calculators may not always let you adjust the figures in your calculation (e.g. the interest rate, loan term etc.), preventing you from being able to see how each may affect the loan. Plus, there may not be an easy way to compare the calculated cost of the bank’s mortgage offers to the value of home loans from other mortgage lenders. 

On the other hand, a mortgage calculator from a home loan comparison site may allow you to enter your own interest rate, loan term and more, giving you more control over your calculations, and a greater understanding of the loans you can apply for. This can help give you a better idea of which home loan features and benefits may affect each home loan’s final cost and value.

What type of calculator should I use when I’m looking to buy?

Much like home loans, mortgage calculators aren’t one-size-fits-all, and there are many options to choose from. 

If you’re starting out, you may want to use a borrowing power calculator, which will help you determine how much money you can expect to take out ahead of pre-approval. You can use this number to gauge how much you think you can afford, and apply that as you search for a home. 

A broker may be able to help maximise your borrowing power, but this is a solid first step to working out what you can spend. 

If you’re closer to buying, a Lender’s Mortgage Insurance calculator will help provide a gauge on how much LMI you might be up for on a property, while a Stamp Duty Calculator assists in understanding any stamp duty you may have to pay on a property.

After this, consider the calculator on this page, the standard Home Loan Calculator, which provides a more firm understanding of what you can expect to pay for a new home. Home loan calculators, such as RateCity’s mortgage calculator, provide a way of working out which loans match your needs and financial situation, ordered by variables that matter most to you. 

What's the next step after using a mortgage calculator?

After the mortgage repayment calculator has told you how much you could expect to pay for your home loan, the next step is to compare the range of home loans that are available on the market, and to consider their interest rates, fees, features and other benefits, such as offset and redraw. There may also be other eligibility criteria or lending criteria for you to fulfil when you’re home buying.

Keep in mind that as well as interest, there may be upfront and ongoing fees and other charges to consider. To get a better idea of a home loan’s overall cost, look at its comparison rate. A mortgage’s interest and standard fees and charges are included when calculating its comparison rate, so you can tell at a glance which loans could end up costing more or less. Just remember that home loan comparison rates are calculated using pre-set assumptions for consistency – different terms will likely apply to your loan, so the comparison rate should provide a guideline only.

Once you find a loan that may match your needs, you can contact the lender directly to make an application. If you’re having trouble working out which mortgage offer may be right for you, a mortgage broker may be able to provide personal financial advice

How can I calculate interest on my home loan?

You can calculate the total interest you will pay over the life of your loan by using a mortgage calculator. The calculator will estimate your repayments based on the amount you want to borrow, the interest rate, the length of your loan, whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor and whether you plan to pay ‘principal and interest’ or ‘interest-only’.

If you are buying a new home, the calculator will also help you work out how much you’ll need to pay in stamp duty and other related costs.

How do I calculate monthly mortgage repayments?

Work out your mortgage repayments using a home loan calculator that takes into account your deposit size, property value and interest rate. This is divided by the loan term you choose (for example, there are 360 months in a 30-year mortgage) to determine the monthly repayments over this time frame.

Over the course of your loan, your monthly repayment amount will be affected by changes to your interest rate, plus any circumstances where you opt to pay interest-only for a period of time, instead of principal and interest.

How much are repayments on a $250K mortgage?

The exact repayment amount for a $250,000 mortgage will be determined by several factors including your deposit size, interest rate and the type of loan. It is best to use a mortgage calculator to determine your actual repayment size.

For example, the monthly repayments on a $250,000 loan with a 5 per cent interest rate over 30 years will be $1342. For a loan of $300,000 on the same rate and loan term, the monthly repayments will be $1610 and for a $500,000 loan, the monthly repayments will be $2684.

How much money can I borrow for a home loan?

Tip: You can use RateCity how much can I borrow calculator to get a quick answer.

How much money you can borrow for a home loan will depend on a number of factors including your employment status, your income (and your partner’s income if you are taking out a joint loan), the size of your deposit, your living expenses and any other debt you might hold, including credit cards. 

A good place to start is to work out how much you can afford to make in monthly repayments, factoring in a buffer of at least 2 – 3 per cent to allow for interest rate rises along the way. You’ll also need to factor in additional costs that come with purchasing a property such as stamp duty, legal fees, building inspections, strata or council fees.

If you are planning on renting the property, you can factor in the expected rental income to help offset the mortgage, but again it’s prudent to add a significant buffer to allow for rental management fees, maintenance costs and short periods of no rental income when tenants move out. It’s also wise to factor in changes in personal circumstances – the typical home loan lasts for around 30 years and a lot can happen between now and then.

What is an interest-only loan? How do I work out interest-only loan repayments?

An ‘interest-only’ loan is a loan where the borrower is only required to pay back the interest on the loan. Typically, banks will only let lenders do this for a fixed period of time – often five years – however some lenders will be happy to extend this.

Interest-only loans are popular with investors who aren’t keen on putting a lot of capital into their investment property. It is also a handy feature for people who need to reduce their mortgage repayments for a short period of time while they are travelling overseas, or taking time off to look after a new family member, for example.

While moving on to interest-only will make your monthly repayments cheaper, ultimately, you will end up paying your bank thousands of dollars extra in interest to make up for the time where you weren’t paying off the principal.

What is the best interest rate for a mortgage?

The fastest way to find out what the lowest interest rates on the market are is to use a comparison website.

While a low interest rate is highly preferable, it is not the only factor that will determine whether a particular loan is right for you.

Loans with low interest rates can often include hidden catches, such as high fees or a period of low rates which jumps up after the introductory period has ended.

To work out the best value for money, have a look at a loan’s comparison rate and read the fine print to get across all the fees and charges that you could be theoretically charged over the life of the loan.

What is an investment loan?

An investment loan is a home loan that is taken out to purchase a property purely for investment purposes. This means that the purchaser will not be living in the property but will instead rent it out or simply retain it for purposes of capital growth.

Which mortgage is the best for me?

The best mortgage to suit your needs will vary depending on your individual circumstances. If you want to be mortgage free as soon as possible, consider taking out a mortgage with a shorter term, such as 25 years as opposed to 30 years, and make the highest possible mortgage repayments. You might also want to consider a loan with an offset facility to help reduce costs. Investors, on the other hand, might have different objectives so the choice of loan will differ.

Whether you decide on a fixed or variable interest rate will depend on your own preference for stability in repayment amounts, and flexibility when it comes to features.

If you do not have a deposit or will not be in a financial position to make large repayments right away you may wish to consider asking a parent to be a guarantor or looking at interest only loans. Again, which one of these options suits you best is reliant on many factors and you should seek professional advice if you are unsure which mortgage will suit you best.

What is 'principal and interest'?

‘Principal and interest’ loans are the most common type of home loans on the market. The principal part of the loan is the initial sum lent to the customer and the interest is the money paid on top of this, at the agreed interest rate, until the end of the loan.

By reducing the principal amount, the total of interest charged will also become smaller until eventually the debt is paid off in full.

How can I negotiate a better home loan rate?

Negotiating with your bank can seem like a daunting task but if you have been a loyal customer with plenty of equity built up then you hold more power than you think. It’s highly likely your current lender won’t want to let your business go without a fight so if you do your research and find out what other banks are offering new customers you might be able to negotiate a reduction in interest rate, or a reduction in fees with your existing lender.

How long should I have my mortgage for?

The standard length of a mortgage is between 25-30 years however they can be as long as 40 years and as few as one. There is a benefit to having a shorter mortgage as the faster you pay off the amount you owe, the less you’ll pay your bank in interest.

Of course, shorter mortgages will require higher monthly payments so plug the numbers into a mortgage calculator to find out how many years you can potentially shave off your budget.

For example monthly repayments on a $500,000 over 25 years with an interest rate of 5% are $2923. On the same loan with the same interest rate over 30 years repayments would be $2684 a month. At first blush, the 30 year mortgage sounds great with significantly lower monthly repayments but remember, stretching your loan out by an extra five years will see you hand over $89,396 in interest repayments to your bank.

Can I take a personal loan after a home loan?

Are you struggling to pay the deposit for your dream home? A personal loan can help you pay the deposit. The question that may arise in your mind is can I take a home loan after a personal loan, or can you take a personal loan at the same time as a home loan, as it is. The answer is that, yes, provided you can meet the general eligibility criteria for both a personal loan and a home loan, your application should be approved. Those eligibility criteria may include:

  • Higher-income to show repayment capability for both the loans
  • Clear credit history with no delays in bill payments or defaults on debts
  • Zero or minimal current outstanding debt
  • Some amount of savings
  • Proven rent history will be positively perceived by the lenders

A personal loan after or during a home loan may impact serviceability, however, as the numbers can seriously add up. Every loan you avail of increases your monthly installments and the amount you use to repay the personal loan will be considered to lower the money available for the repayment of your home loan.

As to whether you can get a personal loan after your home loan, the answer is a very likely "yes", though it does come with a caveat: as long as you can show sufficient income to repay both the loans on time, you should be able to get that personal loan approved. A personal loan can also help to improve your credit score showing financial discipline and responsibility, which may benefit you with more favorable terms for your home loan.

How much deposit do I need for a home loan from ANZ?

Like other mortgage lenders, ANZ often prefers a home loan deposit of 20 per cent or more of the property value when you’re applying for a home loan. It may be possible to get a home loan with a smaller deposit of 10 per cent or even 5 per cent, but there are a few reasons to consider saving a larger deposit if possible:

  • A larger deposit tells a lender that you’re a great saver, which could help increase the chances of your home loan application getting approved.
  • The more money you pay as a deposit, the less you’ll have to borrow in your home loan. This could mean paying off your loan sooner, and being charged less total interest.
  • If your deposit is less than 20 per cent of the property value, you might incur additional costs, such as Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI).

How do I refinance my home loan?

Refinancing your home loan can involve a bit of paperwork but if you are moving on to a lower rate, it can save you thousands of dollars in the long-run. The first step is finding another loan on the market that you think will save you money over time or offer features that your current loan does not have. Once you have selected a couple of loans you are interested in, compare them with your current loan to see if you will save money in the long term on interest rates and fees. Remember to factor in any break fees and set up fees when assessing the cost of switching.

Once you have decided on a new loan it is simply a matter of contacting your existing and future lender to get the new loan set up. Beware that some lenders will revert your loan back to a 25 or 30 year term when you refinance which may mean initial lower repayments but may cost you more in the long run.

How do I take out a low-deposit home loan?

If you want to take out a low-deposit home loan, it might be a good idea to consult a mortgage broker who can give you professional financial advice and organise the mortgage for you.

Another way to take out a low-deposit home loan is to do your own research with a comparison website like RateCity. Once you’ve identified your preferred mortgage, you can apply through RateCity or go direct to the lender.

What is a fixed home loan?

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

Remaining loan term

The length of time it will take to pay off your current home loan, based on the currently-entered mortgage balance, monthly repayment and interest rate.

Monthly Repayment

Your current monthly home loan repayment. To accurately calculate how much you could save, an accurate payment figure is required. If you are not certain, check your bank statement.

Mortgage Balance

The amount you currently owe your mortgage lender. If you are not sure, enter your best estimate.

What happens to my home loan when interest rates rise?

If you are on a variable rate home loan, every so often your rate will be subject to increases and decreases. Rate changes are determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, however often when the RBA changes the cash rate, a number of banks will follow suit, at least to some extent. You can use RateCity cash rate to check how the latest interest rate change affected your mortgage interest rate.

When your rate rises, you will be required to pay your bank more each month in mortgage repayments. Similarly, if your interest rate is cut, then your monthly repayments will decrease. Your lender will notify you of what your new repayments will be, although you can do the calculations yourself, and compare other home loan rates using our mortgage calculator.

There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.