Compare popular home loans

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Advertised Rate
Comparison Rate*
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Monthly Repayment
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Real Time Rating™
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3.27%

Variable

3.28%

HSBC

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.00

/ 5
More details

3.19%

Fixed - 3 years

3.74%

Heritage Bank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 95%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.08

/ 5
More details

3.09%

Variable

3.05%

Athena Home Loans

$1.4k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.15

/ 5
More details

3.36%

Variable

3.39%

IMB Bank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.87

/ 5
More details

3.49%

Variable

3.45%

Athena Home Loans

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.53

/ 5
More details

3.59%

Variable

3.49%

Athena Home Loans

$898

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.10

/ 5
More details

3.59%

Variable

3.24%

Athena Home Loans

$898

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.10

/ 5
More details

3.33%

Variable

3.38%

CUA

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.86

/ 5
More details

2.88%

Variable

2.90%

loans.com.au

$1.4k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.35

/ 5
More details

3.09%

Variable

3.09%

UBank

$1.4k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.27

/ 5
More details

2.99%

Fixed - 3 years

3.45%

UBank

$1.4k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.54

/ 5
More details

2.89%

Fixed - 3 years

3.29%

Virgin Money

$1.4k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.14

/ 5
More details

3.58%

Fixed - 5 years

4.18%

Newcastle Permanent

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 95%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.53

/ 5
More details

3.49%

Variable

3.49%

UBank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.65

/ 5
More details

3.58%

Fixed - 4 years

4.21%

Newcastle Permanent

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 95%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.37

/ 5
More details

3.32%

Variable

3.37%

Heritage Bank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.88

/ 5
More details

2.89%

Fixed - 2 years

3.31%

Virgin Money

$1.4k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 90%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.99

/ 5
More details

3.19%

Fixed - 5 years

3.44%

UBank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.62

/ 5
More details

3.49%

Fixed - 5 years

3.85%

UBank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

3.17

/ 5
More details

3.37%

Variable

3.75%

Heritage Bank

$1.5k

Redraw facility
Offset Account
Borrow up to 80%
Extra Repayments
Interest Only
Owner Occupied

4.03

/ 5
More details

Learn more about home loans

Why you need to compare home loans

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Whether you’re a first home buyer or a long-time property investor, one of the first steps you should take before taking out a mortgage is to compare home loans from a range of Australian lenders. 

Buying a home is arguably the most expensive purchase you’ll ever make, so it pays to do your research. This is first and foremost to ensure you choose the most competitive home loan for your financial needs, and don’t end up paying more than you have to

When it comes to home loan comparison, a lot of people fall into the trap of just looking at the interest rate. 

However, there are several components of a home loan that can influence how much you’ll pay, including:

  • The loan amount
  • The interest rate
  • The loan type (fixed rate, variable rate or split rate loan)
  • What type of borrower you are (owner-occupier or investor)
  • The features (redraw facility, extra repayments, offset accounts etc.)
  • The fees (upfront fees, ongoing fees etc. 

You shouldn’t need a law degree to understand the fine print of a home loan and make your choice. This is where home loan comparison rates come in. 

What is a comparison rate?

A comparison rate is a combination of the loan’s interest rate with its fees and other charges, such as ongoing monthly or yearly fees and upfront fees. 

The comparison rate will combine these fees with the interest rate and then create an average rate for the loan, based on a pre-set loan amount and loan term. 

How to compare home loans 

  1. Comparison tables & tools

One of the best ways to compare home loans in Australia is by utilising home loan comparison tools. These include interest rate comparison tables, mortgage repayment calculators, Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI) calculators and stamp duty calculators. 

RateCity.com.au allows you to easily compare home loans through its easy to navigate comparison tables. Search for and compare home loan interest rates from over 100 Australian lenders, and use the filtering system to narrow down your options to find a loan that suits your specific financial needs. 

You can then click on one or more loans and select ‘Compare’ to see how the loan stacks up against the big four banks and/or any other loans you may be interested in. 

  1. Comparison rates

When it comes to mortgage comparison, you shouldn’t only look at the advertised interest rate. Once you’ve narrowed down a selection of home loans thanks to the comparison tools, you can use the comparison rate as a starting-off guide to calculate your potential mortgage repayments with RateCity.com.au’s mortgage repayment calculator, and measure this against your budget. 

This is one of the more effective ways to compare home loan interest rates as comparison rates give you a more realistic interest rate for what your total costs will be, and allows you to budget your expenses and repayments much more effectively. 

For example

Nick wants to borrow $350,000 for a 30-year home loan and he can afford up to $1,600 a month on mortgage repayments. By using the RateCity.com.au comparison tools, he found a home loan with an interest rate of 3.50 per cent. He then used a mortgage repayment calculator and found his monthly repayments will be $1,572.  

As a rule of thumb, you should avoid paying more than 30 per cent of your income on your mortgage, or risk entering into mortgage stress. 

  1. Look at the features and flexibility

The lowest interest rate isn’t necessarily the most important thing to consider when comparing home loans. If you’re desperate for a home loan with features such as an offset account, there’s no point just looking at the comparison rate. You need to choose a loan that actually suits your financial needs and offers those features. 

RateCity.com.au’s comparison tables allow you to easily view a home loan product’s features, so you can compare what is on offer and level of flexibility in the home loan. 

Home Loans 101 

 What are the best home loan comparison rates in Australia? 

There are a range of factors that you need to consider when comparing home loans, and the best home loan for one person may not necessarily be the best for another. 

While there is no one ‘best’ home loan on the market, you can utilise home loan comparison tools, mortgage repayment calculators, as well as home loan guides to make the most educated decision around what is the best home loan for you. 

It is important that you don’t just look at the comparison rate when choosing your home loan. These are the questions you should ask yourself when comparing your home loan options to find the most competitive mortgage for you: 

  • What is the length of the loan?
  • What will my repayments be?
  • Is the rate fixed, variable or split?
  • Can I make additional repayments?
  • What fees have or haven’t been included in my calculations?
  • Will my mortgage repayments be more than 30 per cent of my pre-tax income? 

What home loan features are available? 

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There are a range of helpful home loan features that allow you to have the most flexibility in your mortgage, including:

Home Loan Feature

About

Additional repayments

Allows you to lower your total interest and shortens the length of your loan. Some fees may apply.

Interest only repayments

Allows you to pay only for the interest on your home loan first, to reduce mortgage repayments in the short term. Will prevent you from growing equity or making a dent in your principal repayments.

Introductory rate

Lower rate offered to new customers to entice them into joining. This will revert to a higher interest rate once this introductory period is over.

Line of credit

Lets you access the equity in your current home to use for a holiday, renovations etc.

Lump sum repayments

Your lender will allow you to make ad-hoc bulk repayments towards your mortgage (useful if you get a large tax return, or come into some money). 

Offset account

A transaction account linked to your home loan where the balance of the transaction account is offset against the unpaid balance of your loan, to reduce the amount of interest payable. Can involve higher interest rates.

Mortgage portability

You can transfer your loan from your current home to a different property, sometimes reducing fees (establishment fees etc.)

Redraw facility

Allows you to access extra payments you’ve made towards the mortgage by using the equity in your home as security to borrow money. The more money you put into a redraw facility, the less you’ll pay on your home loan.

Split loan

For when you can’t decide whether to have a fixed or variable home loan – split it 50/50. 


What home loan fees could I be charged
? 

There are a range of fees that lenders may charge that you should consider when comparing home loans, as they will impact your overall mortgage cost. These include:

  1. Application fee/up-front cost
  2. Ongoing fee
  3. Additional repayment fee
  4. Late payment fee
  5. Break costs and exit fees
  6. Mortgage discharge fee
  7. Redraw facility
  8. Re-fix fee
  9. Switching fee
  10. Portability fee
  11. Lenders Mortgage Insurance (LMI)
  12. Stamp duty 

Home loan comparison calculator  

RateCity.com.au’s home loan comparison calculators can help you to work out which mortgage is best for your financial needs and budget. 

The simple to use mortgage tool allows you to search via comparison rate, view your estimated monthly repayments for that loan, and learn which features the loan does or does not include. 

 

Frequently asked questions

What happens to my home loan when interest rates rise?

If you are on a variable rate home loan, every so often your rate will be subject to increases and decreases. Rate changes are determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, however often when the RBA changes the cash rate, a number of banks will follow suit, at least to some extent. You can use RateCity cash rate to check how the latest interest rate change affected your mortgage interest rate.

When your rate rises, you will be required to pay your bank more each month in mortgage repayments. Similarly, if your interest rate is cut, then your monthly repayments will decrease. Your lender will notify you of what your new repayments will be, although you can do the calculations yourself, and compare other home loan rates using our mortgage calculator.

There is no way of conclusively predicting when interest rates will go up or down on home loans so if you prefer a more stable approach consider opting for a fixed rate loan.

How do I refinance my home loan?

Refinancing your home loan can involve a bit of paperwork but if you are moving on to a lower rate, it can save you thousands of dollars in the long-run. The first step is finding another loan on the market that you think will save you money over time or offer features that your current loan does not have. Once you have selected a couple of loans you are interested in, compare them with your current loan to see if you will save money in the long term on interest rates and fees. Remember to factor in any break fees and set up fees when assessing the cost of switching.

Once you have decided on a new loan it is simply a matter of contacting your existing and future lender to get the new loan set up. Beware that some lenders will revert your loan back to a 25 or 30 year term when you refinance which may mean initial lower repayments but may cost you more in the long run.

How do you determine which home loan rates/products I’m shown?

When you check your home loan rate, you’ll supply some basic information about your current loan, including:

  • the amount owing on your mortgage
  • the value of your property
  • your current interest rate
  • name of existing lender
  • property address

We’ll compare this information to the home loan options in the RateCity database, and show you which home loan products you may be eligible to apply for.

Who has the best home loan?

Determining who has the ‘best’ home loan really does depend on your own personal circumstances and requirements. It may be tempting to judge a loan merely on the interest rate but there can be added value in the extras on offer, such as offset and redraw facilities, that aren’t available with all low rate loans.

To determine which loan is the best for you, think about whether you would prefer the consistency of a fixed loan or the flexibility and potential benefits of a variable loan. Then determine which features will be necessary throughout the life of your loan. Thirdly, consider how much you are willing to pay in fees for the loan you want. Once you find the perfect combination of these three elements you are on your way to determining the best loan for you. 

The fine print – what are the eligibility criteria?

This competition is only available to Australian residents who are over 18 and check their home loan interest rate at RateCity. However, you are not required to refinance your home loan or apply for any financial products.

You can still enter if you don’t have a home loan yet – enter how much you plan to borrow and the details of the property you’re considering, and we’ll compare mortgage offers that may suit your needs and estimate how much you could save compared to a loan with an average interest rate. 

What is a fixed home loan?

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

What is a variable home loan?

A variable rate home loan is one where the interest rate can and will change over the course of your loan. The rate is determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, so while the cash rate might go down, your bank may decide not to follow suit, although they do broadly follow market conditions. One of the upsides of variable rates is that they are typically more flexible than their fixed rate counterparts which means that a lot of these products will let you make extra repayments and offer features such as offset accounts.

Does the Rate Guarantee apply to discounted interest rate offers, such as honeymoon rates?

No. Temporary discounts to home loan interest rates will expire after a limited time, so they aren’t valid for comparing home loans as part of the Rate Guarantee.

However, if your home loan has been discounted from the lender’s standard rate on a permanent basis, you can check if we can find an even lower rate that could apply to you.

What is the difference between fixed, variable and split rates?

Fixed rate

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

Variable rate

A variable rate home loan is one where the interest rate can and will change over the course of your loan. The rate is determined by your lender, not the Reserve Bank of Australia, so while the cash rate might go down, your bank may decide not to follow suit, although they do broadly follow market conditions. One of the upsides of variable rates is that they are typically more flexible than their fixed rate counterparts which means that a lot of these products will let you make extra repayments and offer features such as offset accounts.

Split rates home loans

A split loan lets you fix a portion of your loan, and leave the remainder on a variable rate so you get a bet each way on fixed and variable rates. A split loan is a good option for someone who wants the peace of mind that regular repayments can provide but still wants to retain some of the additional features variable loans typically provide such as an offset account. Of course, with most things in life, split loans are still a trade-off. If the variable rate goes down, for example, the lower interest rates will only apply to the section that you didn’t fix.

How can I calculate interest on my home loan?

You can calculate the total interest you will pay over the life of your loan by using a mortgage calculator. The calculator will estimate your repayments based on the amount you want to borrow, the interest rate, the length of your loan, whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor and whether you plan to pay ‘principal and interest’ or ‘interest-only’.

If you are buying a new home, the calculator will also help you work out how much you’ll need to pay in stamp duty and other related costs.

You couldn’t beat my current rate – how do I claim my reward?

If we can’t beat your current home loan rate, you can claim your $100 gift card by confirming your home loan details with us.*

To do this, on your results page you’ll need to securely upload a bank statement or similar home loan document that can be used to confirm the home loan details you provided. We’ll keep your information private and confidential and only use your document to confirm your entry.

How much are repayments on a $250K mortgage?

The exact repayment amount for a $250,000 mortgage will be determined by several factors including your deposit size, interest rate and the type of loan. It is best to use a mortgage calculator to determine your actual repayment size.

For example, the monthly repayments on a $250,000 loan with a 5 per cent interest rate over 30 years will be $1342. For a loan of $300,000 on the same rate and loan term, the monthly repayments will be $1610 and for a $500,000 loan, the monthly repayments will be $2684.

Home Loans Frequently Asked Questions

What is an ongoing fee?

Ongoing fees are any regular payments charged by your lender in addition to the interest they apply including annual fees, monthly account keeping fees and offset fees. The average annual fee is close to $200 however there are almost 2,000 home loan products that don’t charge an annual fee at all. There’s plenty of extra costs when you’re buying a home, such as conveyancing, stamp duty, moving costs, so the more fees you can avoid on your home loan, the better. While $200 might not seem like much in the grand scheme of things, it adds up to $6,000 over the life of a 30 year loan – money which would be much better off either reinvested into your home loan or in your back pocket for the next rainy day.

Example: Anna is tossing up between two different mortgage products. Both have the same variable interest rate, but one has a monthly account keeping fee of $20. By picking the loan with no fees, and investing an extra $20 a month into her loan, Josie will end up shaving 6 months off her 30 year loan and saving over $9,000* in interest repayments.

Remaining loan term

The length of time it will take to pay off your current home loan, based on the currently-entered mortgage balance, monthly repayment and interest rate.

How do I calculate monthly mortgage repayments?

Work out your mortgage repayments using a home loan calculator that takes into account your deposit size, property value and interest rate. This is divided by the loan term you choose (for example, there are 360 months in a 30-year mortgage) to determine the monthly repayments over this time frame.

Over the course of your loan, your monthly repayment amount will be affected by changes to your interest rate, plus any circumstances where you opt to pay interest-only for a period of time, instead of principal and interest.

What's wrong with traditional ratings systems?

They’re impersonal 

Most comparison sites give you information about rates, fees and features, but expect you’ll pay more with a low advertised rate and $400 ongoing fee or a slightly higher rate and no ongoing fee. The answer is different for each borrower and depends on a number of variables, in particular how big your loan is. Comparisons are either done based on just today or projected over a full 25 or 30 year loan. That’s not how people borrow these days. While you may take a 30 year loan, most borrowers will either upgrade their house or switch their home loan within the first five years. 

You’re also expected to know exactly which features you want. This is fine for the experienced borrower, but most people know some flexibility is a good thing, but don’t know exactly which features offer more flexibility than others. 

What is the flexibility score?

Today’s home loans often try to lure borrowers with a range of flexible features, including offset accounts, redraw facilities, repayment frequency options, repayment holidays, split loan options and portability. Real Time Ratings™ weights each of these features based on popularity and gives loans a ‘flexibility score’ based on how much they cater to borrowers’ needs over time. The aim is to give a higher score to loans which give borrowers more features and options.

They’re not always timely

In today’s competitive home loan market, lenders are releasing new offers almost daily. These offers are often some of the most attractive deals in the market, but won’t get rated by traditional ratings systems for up to a year. 

The assumptions are out of date 

The comparison rate is based on a loan size of $150,000 and a loan term of 25 years. However, the typical loan size is much higher than that. Million dollar loans are becoming increasingly common, especially if you live in metropolitan parts of Australia, like Sydney and Melbourne. It’s also uncommon for borrowers to hold a loan for 25 years. The typical shelf life for a home loan is a few years. 

The other problem is because it’s a percentage, the difference between 3.9 or 3.7 per cent on a $500,000 doesn’t sound like much, but equals around $683 a year. Real Time Ratings™ not only looks at the difference in the monthly repayments, but it will work out the actual cost difference once fees are taken into consideration. 

Who can enter?

Any Australian resident who is over 18 and currently has a personal home loan is eligible for our Rate Guarantee. See terms and conditions.

Mortgage Calculator, Repayments

The money you pay back to your lender at regular intervals. 

How much money can I borrow for a home loan?

Tip: You can use RateCity how much can I borrow calculator to get a quick answer.

How much money you can borrow for a home loan will depend on a number of factors including your employment status, your income (and your partner’s income if you are taking out a joint loan), the size of your deposit, your living expenses and any other debt you might hold, including credit cards. 

A good place to start is to work out how much you can afford to make in monthly repayments, factoring in a buffer of at least 2 – 3 per cent to allow for interest rate rises along the way. You’ll also need to factor in additional costs that come with purchasing a property such as stamp duty, legal fees, building inspections, strata or council fees.

If you are planning on renting the property, you can factor in the expected rental income to help offset the mortgage, but again it’s prudent to add a significant buffer to allow for rental management fees, maintenance costs and short periods of no rental income when tenants move out. It’s also wise to factor in changes in personal circumstances – the typical home loan lasts for around 30 years and a lot can happen between now and then.