Greater Bank

Great Rate Fixed Home Loan (Interest Only) 2 Years

Advertised Rate

2.09%

Fixed - 2 years

Comparison Rate*

3.39%

Maximum LVR
90%
Real Time Rating™

2.34

/ 5
Monthly Repayment

$1,499

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years at 3.39%

Advertised Rate

2.09%

Fixed - 2 years

Comparison Rate*

3.39%

Maximum LVR
90%
Real Time Rating™

2.34

/ 5
Monthly Repayment

$1,499

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years at 3.39%

Calculate your repayments for this loan

I'd like to borrow

$

Loan term

years

Your estimated repayment

$1,499

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years at 3.39%

Greater Bank home loans are available through brokers who can help find the right loan and manage your application at no charge.

Pros and Cons

Pros and Cons

  • Interest rates ranked in the best 20%
  • No upfront or ongoing fees
  • Extra repayments and redraw facility
  • Free redraw facility
  • No offset account
  • Discharge fee at end of loan
  • No repayment holidays

Features and Fees

Greater Bank Features and Fees

Details

Maximum LVR

90%

Total Repayments

Next LVR

Interest rate type

Fixed - 2 years

Borrowing range

Suitable for

Owner Occupiers

Loan term range

1 - 30 years

Principal & interest

Interest only

Applicable states

ACT, NSW, QLD

Make repayments

Monthly

Features

Extra repayments

Yes - limited to 5%

Redraw facility

Redraw fee: $0

Split interest facility

Loan portable

Repayment holiday available

Allow guarantors

Available for first home buyers

Fees

Total estimated upfront fees

$0

Application fee

$0

Valuation fee

$0

Settlement fee

$0

Other upfront fee

$0

Ongoing fee

$0

Discharge fee

$300

Application method

Online

Phone

In branch

Specials
  • Other Borrow up to 110% of the property value by asking your family to guarantee the home loan by using their property as security on your mortgage

Pros and Cons

  • Interest rates ranked in the best 20%
  • No upfront or ongoing fees
  • Extra repayments and redraw facility
  • Free redraw facility
  • No offset account
  • Discharge fee at end of loan
  • No repayment holidays

Greater Bank Features and Fees

Details

Maximum LVR

90%

Total Repayments

Next LVR

Interest rate type

Fixed - 2 years

Borrowing range

Suitable for

Owner Occupiers

Loan term range

1 - 30 years

Principal & interest

Interest only

Applicable states

ACT, NSW, QLD

Make repayments

Monthly

Features

Extra repayments

Yes - limited to 5%

Redraw facility

Redraw fee: $0

Split interest facility

Loan portable

Repayment holiday available

Allow guarantors

Available for first home buyers

Fees

Total estimated upfront fees

$0

Application fee

$0

Valuation fee

$0

Settlement fee

$0

Other upfront fee

$0

Ongoing fee

$0

Discharge fee

$300

Application method

Online

Phone

In branch

Specials
  • Other Borrow up to 110% of the property value by asking your family to guarantee the home loan by using their property as security on your mortgage

FAQs

What is a low-deposit home loan?

A low-deposit home loan is a mortgage where you need to borrow more than 80 per cent of the purchase price – in other words, your deposit is less than 20 per cent of the purchase price.

For example, if you want to buy a $500,000 property, you’ll need a low-deposit home loan if your deposit is less than $100,000 and therefore you need to borrow more than $400,000.

As a general rule, you’ll need to pay LMI (lender’s mortgage insurance) if you take out a low-deposit home loan. You can use this LMI calculator to estimate your LMI payment.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Amount

How much you intend to borrow. 

How do I find out my current interest rate and how much is owing on my loan?

Your bank statements and/or your internet banking should show these details. If you are not sure, call your bank or estimate.

How does Real Time Ratings work?

Real Time RatingsTM looks at your individual home loan requirements and uses this information to rank every applicable home loan in our database out of five.

This score is based on two main factors – cost and flexibility.

Cost is calculated by looking at the interest rates and fees over the first five years of the loan.

Flexibility is based on whether a loan offers features such as an offset account, redraw facility and extra repayments.

Real Time RatingsTM also includes the following assumptions:

  • Costs are calculated on the current variable rate however they could change in the future.
  • Loans are assumed to be principal and interest
  • Fixed-rate loans with terms greater than five years are still assessed on a five-year basis, so 10-year fixed loans are assessed as being only five years’ long.
  • Break costs are not included.

Why was Real Time Ratings developed?

Real Time RatingsTM was developed to save people time and money. A home loan is one of the biggest financial decisions you will ever make – and one of the most complicated. Real Time RatingsTM is designed to help you find the right loan. Until now, there has been no place borrowers can benchmark the latest rates and offers when they hit the market. Rates change all the time now and new offers hit the market almost daily, we saw the need for a way to compare these new deals against the rest of the market and make a more informed decision.

What is the flexibility score?

Today’s home loans often try to lure borrowers with a range of flexible features, including offset accounts, redraw facilities, repayment frequency options, repayment holidays, split loan options and portability. Real Time Ratings™ weights each of these features based on popularity and gives loans a ‘flexibility score’ based on how much they cater to borrowers’ needs over time. The aim is to give a higher score to loans which give borrowers more features and options.

What is a line of credit?

A line of credit, also known as a home equity loan, is a type of mortgage that allows you to borrow money using the equity in your property.

Equity is the value of your property, less any outstanding debt against it. For example, if you have a $500,000 property and a $300,000 mortgage against the property, then you have $200,000 equity. This is the portion of the property that you actually own.

This type of loan is a flexible mortgage that allows you to draw on funds when you need them, similar to a credit card.

How common are low-deposit home loans?

Low-deposit home loans aren’t as common as they once were, because they’re regarded as relatively risky and the banking regulator (APRA) is trying to reduce risk from the mortgage market.

However, if you do your research, you’ll find there is still a fairly wide selection of banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders that offers low-deposit home loans.

Home Loans Frequently Asked Questions

What fees are there when buying a house?

Buying a home comes with ‘hidden fees’ that should be factored in when considering how much the total cost of your new home will be. These can include stamp duty, title registration costs, building inspection fees, loan establishment fee, lenders mortgage insurance (LMI), legal fees and bank valuation costs.

Tip: you can calculate your stamp duty costs as well as LMI in Rate City mortgage repayments calculator

Some of these fees can be taken out of the mix, such as LMI, if you have a big enough deposit or by asking your lender to waive establishment fees for your loan. Even so, fees can run into the thousands of dollars on top of the purchase price.

Keep this in mind when deciding if you are ready to make the move in to the property market.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Term

How long you wish to take to pay off your loan. 

How can I calculate interest on my home loan?

You can calculate the total interest you will pay over the life of your loan by using a mortgage calculator. The calculator will estimate your repayments based on the amount you want to borrow, the interest rate, the length of your loan, whether you are an owner-occupier or an investor and whether you plan to pay ‘principal and interest’ or ‘interest-only’.

If you are buying a new home, the calculator will also help you work out how much you’ll need to pay in stamp duty and other related costs.

Are bad credit home loans dangerous?

Bad credit home loans can be dangerous if the borrower signs up for a loan they’ll struggle to repay. This might occur if the borrower takes out a mortgage at the limit of their financial capacity, especially if they have some combination of a low income, an insecure job and poor savings habits.

Bad credit home loans can also be dangerous if the borrower buys a home in a stagnant or falling market – because if the home has to be sold, they might be left with ‘negative equity’ (where the home is worth less than the mortgage).

That said, bad credit home loans can work out well if the borrower is able to repay the mortgage – for example, if they borrow conservatively, have a decent income, a secure job and good savings habits. Another good sign is if the borrower buys a property in a market that is likely to rise over the long term.

What is break fee?

Break fees are charged when a customer terminates a fixed-rate mortgage. The amount is determined at the time you decide to break the loan and is based on how much your bank stands to lose by you breaking the contract. As a general rule, the more the variable rate has dropped, the higher the fee will be.

Mortgage Balance

The amount you currently owe your mortgage lender. If you are not sure, enter your best estimate.

What is a fixed home loan?

A fixed rate home loan is a loan where the interest rate is set for a certain amount of time, usually between one and 15 years. The advantage of a fixed rate is that you know exactly how much your repayments will be for the duration of the fixed term. There are some disadvantages to fixing that you need to be aware of. Some products won’t let you make extra repayments, or offer tools such as an offset account to help you reduce your interest, while others will charge a significant break fee if you decide to terminate the loan before the fixed period finishes.

How do I take out a low-deposit home loan?

If you want to take out a low-deposit home loan, it might be a good idea to consult a mortgage broker who can give you professional financial advice and organise the mortgage for you.

Another way to take out a low-deposit home loan is to do your own research with a comparison website like RateCity. Once you’ve identified your preferred mortgage, you can apply through RateCity or go direct to the lender.

Switch & Save help desk

How much deposit will I need to buy a house?

A deposit of 20 per cent or more is ideal as it’s typically the amount a lender sees as ‘safe’. Being a safe borrower is a good position to be in as you’ll have a range of lenders to pick from, with some likely to offer up a lower interest rate as a reward. Additionally, a deposit of over 20 per cent usually eliminates the need for lender’s mortgage insurance (LMI) which can add thousands to the cost of buying your home.

While you can get a loan with as little as 5 per cent deposit, it’s definitely not the most advisable way to enter the home loan market. Banks view people with low deposits as ‘high risk’ and often charge higher interest rates as a precaution. The smaller your deposit, the more you’ll also have to pay in LMI as it works on a sliding scale dependent on your deposit size.

What is the difference between offset and redraw?

The difference between an offset and redraw account is that an offset account is intended to work as a transaction account that can be accessed whenever you need. A redraw facility on the other hand is more like an “emergency fund” of money that you can draw on if needed but isn’t used for everyday expenses.