Greater Bank

Great Rate Fixed Investment Loan (Interest Only) (NSW, ACT & QLD only) 1 Year

Advertised Rate

2.49%

Fixed - 1 year

Comparison Rate*

3.90%

Maximum LVR
90%
Real Time Rating™

1.71

/ 5
Monthly Repayment

$1,568

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years at 3.90%

Advertised Rate

2.49%

Fixed - 1 year

Comparison Rate*

3.90%

Maximum LVR
90%
Real Time Rating™

1.71

/ 5
Monthly Repayment

$1,568

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years at 3.90%

Calculate your repayments for this loan

I'd like to borrow

$

Loan term

years

Your estimated repayment

$1,568

based on $350,000 loan amount for 25 years at 3.90%

Greater Bank home loans are available through brokers who can help find the right loan and manage your application at no charge.

Pros and Cons

Pros and Cons

  • Interest rates ranked in the best 20%
  • No upfront or ongoing fees
  • Extra repayments and redraw facility
  • Free redraw facility
  • No offset account
  • Discharge fee at end of loan
  • No repayment holidays

Features and Fees

Greater Bank Features and Fees

Details

Maximum LVR

90%

Total Repayments

Next LVR

Interest rate type

Fixed - 1 year

Borrowing range

Suitable for

Investors

Loan term range

0 - 30 years

Principal & interest

Interest only

Applicable states

ACT, NSW, QLD

Make repayments

Monthly

Features

Extra repayments

Unlimited extra repayments

Redraw facility

Redraw fee: $0

Split interest facility

Loan portable

Repayment holiday available

Allow guarantors

Available for first home buyers

Fees

Total estimated upfront fees

$0

Application fee

$0

Valuation fee

$0

Settlement fee

$0

Other upfront fee

$0

Ongoing fee

$0

Discharge fee

$300

Application method

Online

Phone

In branch

Pros and Cons

  • Interest rates ranked in the best 20%
  • No upfront or ongoing fees
  • Extra repayments and redraw facility
  • Free redraw facility
  • No offset account
  • Discharge fee at end of loan
  • No repayment holidays

Greater Bank Features and Fees

Details

Maximum LVR

90%

Total Repayments

Next LVR

Interest rate type

Fixed - 1 year

Borrowing range

Suitable for

Investors

Loan term range

0 - 30 years

Principal & interest

Interest only

Applicable states

ACT, NSW, QLD

Make repayments

Monthly

Features

Extra repayments

Unlimited extra repayments

Redraw facility

Redraw fee: $0

Split interest facility

Loan portable

Repayment holiday available

Allow guarantors

Available for first home buyers

Fees

Total estimated upfront fees

$0

Application fee

$0

Valuation fee

$0

Settlement fee

$0

Other upfront fee

$0

Ongoing fee

$0

Discharge fee

$300

Application method

Online

Phone

In branch

FAQs

What is Lender's Mortgage Insurance (LMI)

Lender’s Mortgage Insurance (LMI) is an insurance policy, which protects your bank if you default on the loan (i.e. stop paying your loan). While the bank takes out the policy, you pay the premium. Generally you can ‘capitalise’ the premium – meaning that instead of paying it upfront in one hit, you roll it into the total amount you owe, and it becomes part of your regular mortgage repayments.

This additional cost is typically required when you have less than 20 per cent savings, or a loan with an LVR of 80 per cent or higher, and it can run into thousands of dollars. The policy is not transferrable, so if you sell and buy a new house with less than 20 per cent equity, then you’ll be required to foot the bill again, even if you borrow with the same lender.

Some lenders, such as the Commonwealth Bank, charge customers with a small deposit a Low Deposit Premium or LDP instead of LMI. The cost of the premium is included in your loan so you pay it off over time.

How much of the RBA rate cut do lenders pass on to borrowers?

When the Reserve Bank of Australia cuts its official cash rate, there is no guarantee lenders will then pass that cut on to lenders by way of lower interest rates. 

Sometimes lenders pass on the cut in full, sometimes they partially pass on the cut, sometimes they don’t at all. When they don’t, they often defend the decision by saying they need to balance the needs of their shareholders with the needs of their borrowers. 

As the attached graph shows, more recent cuts have seen less lenders passing on the full RBA interest rate cut; the average lender was more likely to pass on about two-thirds of the 25 basis points cut to its borrowers.  image002

How common are low-deposit home loans?

Low-deposit home loans aren’t as common as they once were, because they’re regarded as relatively risky and the banking regulator (APRA) is trying to reduce risk from the mortgage market.

However, if you do your research, you’ll find there is still a fairly wide selection of banks, credit unions and non-bank lenders that offers low-deposit home loans.

Mortgage Calculator, Loan Results

These are the loans that may be suitable, based on your pre-selected criteria. 

How can I use the $100 gift card?

Your $100 gift card works just like a digital VISA debit card and can be used anywhere that these cards are accepted until its balance runs out.

What is break fee?

Break fees are charged when a customer terminates a fixed-rate mortgage. The amount is determined at the time you decide to break the loan and is based on how much your bank stands to lose by you breaking the contract. As a general rule, the more the variable rate has dropped, the higher the fee will be.

What is a cooling-off period?

Once a home loan’s contracts are exchanged between the borrower and the lender, a five-day cooling-off period follows, during which the contracts may be cancelled if needed.

How much money can I borrow for a home loan?

Tip: You can use RateCity how much can I borrow calculator to get a quick answer.

How much money you can borrow for a home loan will depend on a number of factors including your employment status, your income (and your partner’s income if you are taking out a joint loan), the size of your deposit, your living expenses and any other debt you might hold, including credit cards. 

A good place to start is to work out how much you can afford to make in monthly repayments, factoring in a buffer of at least 2 – 3 per cent to allow for interest rate rises along the way. You’ll also need to factor in additional costs that come with purchasing a property such as stamp duty, legal fees, building inspections, strata or council fees.

If you are planning on renting the property, you can factor in the expected rental income to help offset the mortgage, but again it’s prudent to add a significant buffer to allow for rental management fees, maintenance costs and short periods of no rental income when tenants move out. It’s also wise to factor in changes in personal circumstances – the typical home loan lasts for around 30 years and a lot can happen between now and then.

What is a guarantor?

A guarantor is someone who provides a legally binding promise that they will pay off a mortgage if the principal borrower fails to do so.

Often, guarantors are parents in a solid financial position, while the principal borrower is a child in a weaker financial position who is struggling to enter the property market.

Lenders usually regard borrowers as less risky when they have a guarantor – and therefore may charge lower interest rates or even approve mortgages they would have otherwise rejected.

However, if the borrower falls behind on their repayments, the lender might chase the guarantor for payment. In some circumstances, the lender might even seize and sell the guarantor’s property to recoup their money.

Mortgage Calculator, Repayment Type

Will you pay off the amount you borrowed + interest or just the interest for a period?

What happens to your mortgage when you die?

There is no hard and fast answer to what will happen to your mortgage when you die as it is largely dependent on what you have set out in your mortgage agreement, your will (if you have one), other assets you may have and if you have insurance. If you have co-signed the mortgage with another person that person will become responsible for the remaining debt when you die.

If the mortgage is in your name only the house will be sold by the bank to cover the remaining debt and your nominated air will receive the remaining sum if there is a difference. If there is a turn in the market and the sale of your house won’t cover the remaining debt the case may go to court and the difference may have to be covered by the sale of other assets.  

If you have a life insurance policy your family may be able to use some of the lump sum payment from this to pay down the remaining mortgage debt. Alternatively, your lender may provide some form of mortgage protection that could assist your family in making repayments following your passing.

What is a debt service ratio?

A method of gauging a borrower’s home loan serviceability (ability to afford home loan repayments), the debt service ratio (DSR) is the fraction of an applicant’s income that will need to go towards paying back a loan. The DSR is typically expressed as a percentage, and lenders may decline loans to borrowers with too high a DSR (often over 30 per cent).

Remuneration disclaimer

How much is the first home buyer's grant?

The first home buyer grant amount will vary depending on what state you’re in and the value of the property that you are purchasing. In general, they start around $10,000 but it is advisable to check your eligibility for the grant as well as how much you are entitled to with your state or territory’s revenue office.

What is breach of contract?

A failure to follow all or part of a contract or breaking the conditions of a contract without any legal excuse. A breach of contract can be material, minor, actual or anticipatory, depending on the severity of the breaches and their material impact.

What is the difference between offset and redraw?

The difference between an offset and redraw account is that an offset account is intended to work as a transaction account that can be accessed whenever you need. A redraw facility on the other hand is more like an “emergency fund” of money that you can draw on if needed but isn’t used for everyday expenses.

How does a line of credit work?

A line of credit functions in a similar way to a credit card. You have a pre-approved borrowing limit and can draw on as little or as much of that sum as you need it, with interest paid on the outstanding balance.

Popular products include Commonwealth Bank Viridian Line of Credit, ANZ Equity Manager, Westpac Equity Access and NAB Flexiplus.

What is a redraw fee?

Redraw fees are charged by your lender when you want to take money you have already paid into your mortgage back out. Typically, banks will only allow you to take money out of your loan if you have a redraw facility attached to your loan, and the money you are taking out is part of any additional repayments you’ve made. The average redraw fee is around $19 however there are plenty of lenders who include a number of fee-free redraws a year. Tip: Negative-gearers beware – any money redrawn is often treated as new borrowing for tax purposes, so there may be limits on how you can use it if you want to maximise your tax deduction.

How does Real Time Ratings work?

Real Time RatingsTM looks at your individual home loan requirements and uses this information to rank every applicable home loan in our database out of five.

This score is based on two main factors – cost and flexibility.

Cost is calculated by looking at the interest rates and fees over the first five years of the loan.

Flexibility is based on whether a loan offers features such as an offset account, redraw facility and extra repayments.

Real Time RatingsTM also includes the following assumptions:

  • Costs are calculated on the current variable rate however they could change in the future.
  • Loans are assumed to be principal and interest
  • Fixed-rate loans with terms greater than five years are still assessed on a five-year basis, so 10-year fixed loans are assessed as being only five years’ long.
  • Break costs are not included.

Why is it important to get the most up-to-date information?

The mortgage market changes constantly. Every week, new products get launched and existing products get tweaked. Yet many ratings and awards systems rank products annually or biannually.

We update our product data as soon as possible when lenders make changes, so if a bank hikes its interest rates or changes its product, the system will quickly re-evaluate it.

Nobody wants to read a weather forecast that is six months old, and the same is true for home loan comparisons.